Geoffrey Chaucer:
The Electronic Canterbury Tales

Daniel T. Kline | U of Alaska Anchorage | Dept of English | CV | Chaucer Pedagogy  

ECT - LBW Main Page

  1. The Canterbury Tales in Middle English
  2. The Canterbury Tales in Translation
  3. General Historical & Cultural Backgrounds
  4. Sources, Analogues, & Related Texts
  5. Online Notes & Commentary
  6. Online Articles & Books
  7. Student Projects & Essays
  8. Online Bibliography
  9. Syllabi & Course Descriptions
  10. Images & Multimedia
  11. Audio Files & Language Helps
  12. Potpourri
  13. Additional Resources
  14. Scholar's Dozen

  15. What's New? Recent Additions to the ECT


Web Resources by Tale 

Electronic Canterbury Tales Home

Fragment I / Group A
The General Prologue
The Knight's Tale
The Miller's Prologue & Tale
The Reeve's Prologue & Tale
The Cook's Prologue & Tale

Fragment II / Group B1
The Man of Law's Introduction, Prologue, Tale, & Epilogue

Fragment III / Group D
The Wife of Bath's Prologue & Tale
The Friar's Prologue & Tale
The Summoner's Prologue & Tale

Fragment IV / Group E
The Clerk's Prologue & Tale
The Merchant's Prologue, Tale, & Epilogue
 
Fragment V / Group F
The Squire's Introduction & Tale
The Franklin's Prologue & Tale

Fragment VI / Group C
The Physician's Tale
The Pardoner's Introduction, Prologue, & Tale

Fragment VII / Group B2
The Shipman's Tale
The Prioress's Prologue & Tale
The Prologue & Tale of Sir Thopas
The Tale of Melibee
The Monk's Prologue & Tale
The Nun's Priest's Prologue,
Tale, & Epilogue

 
Fragment VIII / Group G
The Second Nun's Prologue & Tale
The Canon's Yeoman's Prologue & Tale

Fragment IX / Group H 
The Manciple's Prologue & Tale

Fragment X / Group I
The Parson's Prologue & Tale
The Retraction


Additional Pages in The Electronic Canterbury Tales


About This Website


ECT - LBW Main > What's New?

Electronic Canterbury Tales Home


15.  WHAT'S NEW?


Recent Additions - as of 09 August 2006

August 2006

Although not Chaucer related, the Archimedes Palimpsest, detailing the efforts of scientists and scholars to recover the earliest Greek text of Archimedes' The Method, Stomachion, and On Floating Bodies beneath the text of a 10th century prayer book, is a fascinating website describing state-of-the art conservation and recovery technologies applied to a medieval manuscript. Well worth a look.

Although a commercial site, billyandcharlie.com, specialists in pewter, has affordable and lovely modern reproductions of pilgrim badges and ampullae from medieval Canterbury, including:

I receive no royalties from billyandcharlie.com sales, unfortunately.

Gallica, the website of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BNF), has also made available online page images of a number of older, out of copyright journals related to Chaucer and medieval studies, like:

Some of the absolutely classic Chaucer-related articles from these journals include:

Click on Périodiques to go to a full listing of BNF online journals (most of which are in French). These are large, generally slow loading graphical images, but are valuable nonetheless.

Gallica, the website of the Bibliothèque nationale de France, has made available online page images of an invaluable source, the Acta Sanctorum (Deeds of the Saints), from the Bollandist Society:

Click "Periodiques" at the main page, and scroll down to "Religions chretiennes"

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts (University College, Cork) houses cornucopia of material related to medieval Ireland, many in modern English translation, including:

  • The Annals of Ulster AD 431-1201 (HTML & PLAIN)
  • The Annals of Ulster AD 1202-1378 (HTML & PLAIN)
  • The Annals of Ulster AD 1379-1541(HTML and PLAIN)
  • Chronicon Scotorum (HTML & PLAIN)
  • St. Columba
    • On the Life of Saint Columba [Betha Choluim Chille] (W. Stokes) (HTML & PLAIN)
    • The Life of Columba, written by Adamnan (W. Reeves)(HTML & PLAIN)
    • Monks' Rules of Columbanus (G. S. M. Walker) (HTML & PLAIN)
    • Sermons of Columbanus (G. S. M. Walker) (HTML & PLAIN)
    • Letters of Columbanus (G. S. M. Walker) (HTML & PLAIN)
  • The Irish Lives of Guy of Warwick & Bevis of Hampton (HTML & PLAIN)
  • The Irish Version of the Historia Britonum of Nennius (HTML & PLAIN)
  • The Kildare Poems Modern English by A. Lucas (HTML and PLAIN)
  • On the Life of Saint Patrick [Betha Phatraic] (W. Stokes) (HTML & PLAIN)
  • On the Life of Saint Brigit [Betha Brigte] (W. Stokes)(HTML & PLAIN)
  • Tidings of Doomsday (W. Stokes) (HTML & PLAIN)
  • The Tidings of the Resurrection (W. Stokes) (HTML & PLAIN)
  • The fifteen tokens of Doomsday (W. Stokes) (HTML & PLAIN)
  • The vision of Laisrén (HTML & PLAIN)

As of 31 July 2006, CELT offered 649 texts (many from later periods of literature, and also in SGML).

July 2006: Major repairs, revisions, & additions:

1.  Major repair (more than 1200 broken links). 

2.  Added a number of miscellaneous links

3.  Deep linking to 

  • The Canterbury Tales Project resources
  • Essays in Medieval Studies online
  • The Medieval Review online
  • The 1995 Cultural Frictions conference at Georgetown U
  • Paul Halsall's IMSB, "The Calamitous Fourteenth Century"
  • Hallsall's Internet Jewish Sourcebook (on the ECT Prioress's Tale page)

4.  Although a commercial site, billyandcharlie.com, specialists in pewter, has affordable and lovely modern reproductions of pilgrim badges and ampullae from medieval Canterbury, including:

I receive no royalties from billyandcharlie.com sales, unfortunately.

5.  Barbara Bordalejo, current director of the Canterbury Tales Project, has also generously made her two dissertations available online (unrevised):

The Phylogeny of the Tale-Order in the Canterbury Tales (NYU):

The Manuscript Source of Caxton's Second Edition of the Canterbury Tales and Its Place in the Textual Tradition of the Tales (DeMonfort U):

Bordalejo also states, "Although these versions are thought to be the same as those publically available through University of Michigan, as a textual critic I am aware that 'textual control' is never as strict as one thinks. I would appreciate if you could contact me if you intend to quote from these works."

July 2006

Major repair (more than 1200 broken links). Added a number of miscellaneous links

Deep linking to 

  • The Canterbury Tales Project resources
  • Essays in Medieval Studies online
  • The Medieval Review online
  • The 1995 Cultural Frictions conference at Georgetown U
  • Paul Halsall's IMSB, "The Calamitous Fourteenth Century"
  • Hallsall's Internet Jewish Sourcebook (on the ECT Prioress's Tale page)

The Prioress's Tale evidences one of the most pernicious aspects of medieval culture: Its pervasive antisemitism. So, the tale explicitly invokes the multifaceted relationship of Christianity and Judaism.  Part of Paul Halsall's extensive Internet Medieval Source Book, the Internet Jewish History Source Book houses an extensive collection of primary sources related to the Jewish Middle Ages. Some of the extensive listing of documents under Christian Anti-Semitism / Latin Christianity, relating specifically to England include (lightly edited): 

Continental and Papal pronouncements include:

Relations between Christians and Jews in England are illustrated by the following. (I've slightly edited and rearranged some of Halsall's links here for their relevance to England): 

I found another geocities.com website that houses a number of Chaucer essays:

Michael Delahoyde has posted an eminently readable series of notes to the General Prologue and each of the Canterbury Tales at his Washington State U website:

The B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library at Long Island University has made available a number of images of the stunningly beautiful Ellesmere ms:

You can easily see difference in quality of the El ms as compared to most other pre-1500 Chaucer ms. 

A number of images related to the Tales and CTales manuscripts:

  • The "pilgrim steps" leading to Thomas Becket's tomb at Caterbury Cathedral (Frederick Christian Bauerschmidt, Loyola, Maryland).
  • Stained glass image of St. Thomas Becket (Canterbury Cathedral, 13th century) (Frederick Christian Bauerschmidt, Loyola, Maryland).
  • London's Inner Temple, the 'law school' where the Manciple is said to have served (A.567) and the Sergeant of Law would have been trained (A.309-30), has put online a concise account of its history and development.
  • See images of the Hengwrt ms at the National Library of Wales website.
  • See the detailed images at Kevin Kiernan's webpage (UKentucky) of 
    • (Hg) National Library of Wales MS. Peniarth 392 D
    • (El) Henry E. Huntington Library MS. El.26C.9
    • (La) British Library MS. Lansdowne 851
  • The Huntington Library Press has released several images online in conjunction with their publication, The Ellesmere Manuscript of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, by Herbert C. Schulz.

The University of Chicago has issued a centennial celebration that includes profiles of noted faculty, like J.M. Manley and Edith Rickert:

  • "In 1924, John Matthews Manly proposed a systematic study of the complete works of Geoffrey Chaucer, anticipating that the work "would necessarily require several years." Although the "several years" were to become sixteen, Manly and his collaborator, Edith Rickert, produced the eight-volume edition of The Text of the Canterbury Tales (1940) that was immediately hailed as the defining work in the field of Chaucerian studies."
  • Their discoveries included University of Chicago Ms. 564, a "mid-fifteenth-century codex is one of fifty-seven relatively complete manuscript copies of the Tales and one of only two containing a passage from the 'Tale of Melibeus'."

David Scott Wilson-Okamura (East Carolina U) has developed a fine classroom exercise, with bibliography, illustrating Examples of Chaucerian Revision and "describing examples of authorial revision in the Canterbury Tales. Probably best used in conjunction with a facsimile of the Hengwrt manuscript." In Wilson-Okamura's own words, "Note: author buys Ralph Hanna's booklet theory of Hengwrt MS without reservation, ignores N. F. Blake at his peril." Also available as a .pdf file. 

From Barbara Bordalejo (Canterbury Tales Project - DeMontfort U), a fully searchable online edition of Caxton's two printed editions of the Canterbury Tales: Caxton's Canterbury Tales: The British Library Copies. Search the page by page comparison of Caxton's two editions.

A real boon for scholars, the Canterbury Tales Project (Peter Robinson, U of Birmingham) has generously made available a series of articles and working papers describing the CTProject in detail, including the following:


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